Boston

Astronomy
Welcome to the Boston Astronomy website ...

This website has been created by and is supported by a group of Boston, MA - area amateur astronomers. It is intended to be a convenient site to access news and information about astronomy and space-related activities of interest to the community and the public.


















       

            


                 

Next Astronomy Course:

             

Meet the Universe

            

We sit around our campfires as the ancients did, and ponder. How did the Universe come into existence? How did life begin? Are we alone? But now we see a Universe around us containing black holes, dark matter, and expanding space. What does it all mean? In this course we’ll sit around our own campfire, and try to piece together the stories that modern astronomy is teaching us.  

     

One meeting will be at a local observatory.

     

No math or science background required!

    

Meets at the Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 8 Tuesdays: September 25, 2018 - November 13, 2018, 7:45 PM - 9:15 PM.

        

Cost: $ 200.00. REGISTER

                                                        


          

 Spring / Summer Astronomy-Related Events in the Boston Area  

                                                   

            

Saturday, June 9, 2018, 8:30 PM

Astronomy Night

Robbins Farm Park

Arlington, MA

http://www.arlingtonastronomy.org/

Both Jupiter and Venus are higher in the sky now, though Venus is still setting not long after sun down. While the planets typically move further along the sky day to day, due to Venus's orbit closer to the Sun, it can appear to move in a retrograde fashion from our perspective. A moonless sky reveals more stars than our previous night.

 

  

Thursday, June 14, 2018, 8:00 PM - 10 PM

Amateur Telescope Makers of Boston (ATMoB) Monthly Meeting

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

60 Garden St.

Cambridge, MA 02138

http://www.atmob.org

Topic and Speaker: "Mysterious Mars", Kelly Beatty
Why are we so fascinated with Mars, our neighbor in space? Why is it so like our own Earth in some ways — and so utterly different in others? Come along as we explore the "Red Planet" from afar and up close. (You'll go right onto the dusty Martian surface, thanks to 3-D imagery — glasses provided!) Meanwhile, spacecraft from NASA and the European Space Agency are scrutinizing every bit of its globe — both from orbit and from the ground — to determine the planet's geologic history. We'll delve into the real odds of finding life there. And get ready for the forthcoming favorable opposition of Mars this summer — its closest pass to Earth in 15 years! Kelly Beatty, a Sky and Telescope Senior Contributing Editor, joined the staff in 1974 and served as the editor of Night Sky, a magazine for beginning stargazers, in 2004-07. After 43 years of pounding the keyboard, he retired from full-time work in early 2018 but remains actively involved in many Sky & Telescope articles, tours, and other projects. Specializing in planetary science and space exploration, Kelly conceived and edited The New Solar System, considered a standard reference among planetary scientists. He also taught astronomy for six years at the Dexter Southfield School in Brookline, Massachusetts. Kelly has been honored twice by the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) of the American Astronomical Society. In 2005 he received the Harold Masursky Award for meritorious service, and in 2009 he was honored with the inaugural Jonathan Eberhart Journalism Award. He is also a recipient of the prestigious Astronomical League Award (in 2006) for his contributions to the science of astronomy and the American Geophysical Union's Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism (2009). You'll occasionally hear his interviews and guest commentaries on The Weather Channel and National Public Radio, and his work has appeared in numerous other magazines, newspapers, and encyclopedias. In fact, Kelly enjoys speaking to audiences of all ages and interest levels about his passion for astronomy. He observes when he can through one of his eight telescopes, and he is active nationally in the fight against light pollution. Kelly hails from Madera, California. He holds a Bachelors degree in geology from the California Institute of Technology and a Master's degree in science journalism from Boston University. During the 1980s he was among the first Western journalists to gain firsthand access to the Soviet space program. Asteroid 2925 Beatty was named on the occasion of his marriage in 1983, and in 1986 he was chosen one of the 100 semifinalists for NASA's Journalist in Space program.

     

Thursday, July 12, 2018, 8:00 PM - 10 PM

Amateur Telescope Makers of Boston (ATMoB) Monthly Meeting

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

60 Garden St.

Cambridge, MA 02138

http://www.atmob.org

   

   

Friday, July 13 -  Saturday, July 14, 2018

Connecticut River Valley Astronomers Conjunction
Northfield Mountain Recreational and Environmental Center
Northfield, MA
http://www.philharrington.net/astroconjunction/
 

             

  

Saturday, July 14,  2018, 8:45 PM

Astronomy Night

Robbins Farm Park

Arlington, MA

http://www.arlingtonastronomy.org/

Jupiter is now high in the southern sky at sundown and Saturn is now rising in the East, displaying its rings in increasing clarity as it rises higher in the sky. The Moon is setting at dusk, just above Mercury. Venus is still up in the West.

     

  

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:45 PM

Astronomy Night

Robbins Farm Park

Arlington, MA

http://www.arlingtonastronomy.org/

Jupiter and Saturn are up in the southern sky, and a moonless night lets us see into the deep sky. As the sky darkens, Mars rises in the East, giving us a first glimpse of the Red Planet for the season.

     

     

Thursday, August 9 - Sunday, August 12, 2018

Stellafane
Springfield, VT
http://stellafane.org/

     

  

Friday, August 10 - Sunday, August 19, 2018

Summer Star Party
Peppermint Park Camping Resort
Plainfield, MA
http://www.rocklandastronomy.com/ssp.html
        

         

   

     

Plus (ongoing):        

          

Wednesdays:

Boston University

Boston, MA.
Open Night at Coit Observatory most Wednesdays 8:30 PM - 9:30 PM. 

617-353-2630
http://www.bu.edu/astronomy/events/public-open-night-at-the-observatory/  

    

 

Thursdays (every third Thursday of the month, January-May & September-November, 8:30 - 10:30 PM)

CfA Public Observatory Night

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

60 Garden St.

Cambridge, MA 02138

https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/publicevents

    

    

Fridays:

Astronomy After Hours (starting April 13; 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM)

Guilliland Observatory

Museum of Science

Boston, MA

https://www.mos.org/public-events/astronomy-after-hours

Did you know that the Museum offers our starry-eyed public free evenings full of astronomy-themed fun? Join us, weather-permitting*, at the Gilliland Observatory on the roof of the Museum’s parking garage. On clear nights, you can view stars, planets, the Moon, and other astronomical phenomena. On cloudy nights, tour the inside of our Observatory and participate in a variety of hands-on astronomy and space science activities with Museum staff.

In 2018, this seasonal program will run on Friday nights from April 13 – October 26 and Thursday nights from July 5 – August 30. Hours vary as sunset times shift throughout the season.

  • Fridays, April 13 – 27: 8:00-10:00

  • Fridays in May and June: 8:30-10:30

  • Thursdays and Fridays in July and August: 8:30-10:30

  • Fridays in September and October: time TBD

*On rainy nights and nights when there are chances of thunderstorms, we’ll offer a variety of astronomy and space and earth science activities in the Suit/Cabot Laboratory, located in the Red Wing, Lower Level.

For more details, and to find out which location Astronomy After Hours will be running on a scheduled evening, call our hotline at 617-589-0267. We update with the evening’s plans by 5:30 pm on the day of the program.

Please be aware that throughput in the Observatory is limited. During the summer when we are the busiest, please plan to arrive no later than half an hour before the end of the program to ensure a place in line. Visitors arriving less than a half-hr before close may participate in other astronomy-themed activities but will be admitted to the observatory only as time allows.

       

                

     

Current Night Sky: June 2018

                                                                                       

            Phases of the Moon:

           

Last Quarter Moon

June 6

2:32 PM EDT

New Moon

June 13

3:43 PM EDT

First Quarter Moon

June 20

6:51 AM EDT

Full Moon

June 28

12:53 AM EDT

     

       

Planet Visibility:

    

In Evening (after sunset):

    Mercury, in NW

    Venus, in W

    Jupiter, in S

    Saturn, SE 

         

At Midnight:

    Jupiter, in SW

    Saturn, in SE

    Mars, in SE   

                     

 In Morning (before sunrise):

    Saturn, in SW 

    Mars, in S

    Neptune, in SE

    Uranus, in E 

                       

           

Comets:

    

    •     There are no comets brighter than magnitude 8 visible this month.
  •          

Meteors:

     

  •     There are no significant meteor showers in June.
                     

                                                                           

              

     Venus buzzes the Beehive Cluster (M44). The open cluster looks like a small, nebulous object to the naked eye. A telescope, though, is overkill; its field of view is too small to embrace the entire cluster. The ideal instrument for appreciating the Beehive is a pair of binoculars; they can bring forth the richness of the hundreds of stars making up the cluster while providing a comfortable field of view. The Beehive is about 600 light-years distant; Venus is just 9.5 light-minutes away!

(June 18, 2018, 11:00 PM EDT).

       

                              

  

               Earth’s rotational axis always points toward the celestial pole, 23.5° away from the axis of its orbit around the Sun. When the planet reaches its June location, the Northern Hemisphere is at its maximum tilt toward the Sun; it is experiencing the warmth of summer. The Southern Hemisphere, in the meantime,

 is tilted at a shallower angle to the Sun; there, winter is bringing cooler weather.

       

                     

  

          Saturn reaches opposition on June 27; it lies opposite the Sun in our sky, rising at sunset and setting at sunrise.

It is also at its brightest, largest, and nearest to Earth – around 841 million miles distant. In this view some of Saturn’s larger moons are visible:

Rhea (on left), Tethys (lower right), and Dione and bright Titan (above).

 (June 27, 2018, 4:00 AM EDT).

           
                    

The Summer Sky

                                     

With the arrival of warmer weather, we can expect to be spending a lot more time under the stars. Whether we’re viewing the sky from a camp site in the forest, a suburban backyard, or a city park, a map can help us get oriented. The star chart below may look bewildering or overflowing with detail, but in order to use it, you only have to know one thing, and you have to be prepared to perform one mental trick.

              

        

The thing you have to know is what direction you are facing. You can determine your North, South, East, and West directions from a map, a compass, or – more likely these days – a smart device. Let’s say you’ve done that; now hold the chart over your head, with the “S” on the map matched up to the direction you’ve determined to be South.

And now for the mental trick: imagine the sky above your head to have the shape of an inverted bowl, with us at the center; the top of the bowl is directly overhead, and the sides of the bowl drop toward the horizon.

The star pattern you see up in the sky should roughly correspond to the features in the star map you are holding in your hands. (The features shown are accurate for June 20 at 9:45 PM; the main difference on other dates is the position of the Moon, which changes dramatically night to night.)

The names of some of the stars may be familiar to you. The white hatched line around the middle is the Celestial Equator, and it is centered around Polaris, which marks the North Celestial Pole.

All of the natural objects in the sky – the Sun, the Moon, the planets, and all the stars – follow a portion of an arc around the North Celestial Pole; they rise in the East, get highest in the South, and set in the West.

The green hatched line represents the Ecliptic: the plane of the Solar System. You may notice that Saturn, Jupiter, the Moon, and Venus are all close to this line. When they are visible, the remaining planets will also be found along the Ecliptic. Now you know not to look for Mars near Deneb or Vega (or overhead!).

There is infinitely more detail to explore, but a star chart can serve as a map to make the summer sky a little more familiar.  

       


   
                                                                        Major Astronomical Events: June / July 2018
               
    

June / July 2018

    

June 1

Fri.

    

Hayabusa-2 orbital insertion around asteroid (162173) Ryugu

June 2

Sat.

12:35 PM EDT

Moon @ apogee (405,317 km / 251,852 mi)

June 3

Sun.

8:00 AM EDT

Moon 3° N of Mars

June 3 Sun. 10:26 PM EDT - 10:30 PM EDT Brightest ISS pass of month (mag. - 4.0, 84°)

June 4

Mon.

     

New Horizons wakes from hiberation prior to MU69 encounter

June 5

Tue.

10:00 PM EDT

Mercury @ superior conjunction

June 6

Wed.

2:00 PM EDT

Moon 2° S of Neptune

June 6

Wed.

2:32 PM EDT

Last Quarter Moon

June 8

Fri.

9:00 PM EDT

Venus 5° S of Pollux

June 9

Sat.

11:00 PM EDT

Moon 5° S of Uranus

June 13

Wed.

3:43 PM EDT

New Moon

June 14

Thur.

7:53 PM EDT

Moon @ perigee (359,503 km / 223,385 mi)

June 15

Fri.

5:07 AM EDT

Earliest  sunrise of year (5:07 AM EDT)

June 16

Sat.

4:32 AM EDT

Earliest beginning of morning civil twilight

June 16

Sat.

9:00 AM EDT

Moon 2° S of Venus

June 16 Sat. 4:00 PM EDT Moon 1.5° S of Beehive (M44)

June 17

Sun.

3:47 AM EDT

Earliest beginning of morning nautical twilight

June 18

Mon.

2:52 AM EDT

Earliest beginning of morning astronomical twilight

June 18 Mon. 8:00 AM EDT Moon 1.7° N of Regulus
June 19 Tue. 1:00 AM EDT Vesta @ closest approach (1.14 AU / 212 million km / 132 million mi)

June 19

Tue.

4:00 PM EDT

Asteroid 4 Vesta @ opposition

June 20

Wed.

6:51 AM EDT

First Quarter Moon

June 21

Thur.

6:07 AM EDT

June (Summer) Solstice

June 21 Thur. 5:00 PM EDT Sun enters Gemini

June 23

Sat.

3:00 PM EDT

Moon 4° N of Jupiter

June 24 Sun. 10:40 PM EDT Latest end of evening astronomical twilight

June 25

Mon.

12:00 PM EDT

Mercury 5° S of Pollux

June 25 Mon. 9::00 PM EDT Moon 9° N of Antares
June 25 Mon. 9:45 PM EDT Latest end of evening nautical twilight
June 26 Tue. 9:00 PM EDT Latest end of evening civil twilight
June 27 Wed. 4:00 AM EDT Saturn @ closest approach (9.05 AU / 1.35 billion km / 841 million mi)

June 27

Wed.

5:00 AM EDT

Moon 0.3° N of asteroid 4 Vesta

June 27 Wed. 9:00 AM EDT Saturn @ opposition
June 27 Wed. 8:25 PM EDT Latest sunset of year (8:25:22 PM EDT)

June 28

Thur.

12:00 AM EDT

Moon 1.8° N of Saturn

June 28

Thur.

12:53 AM EDT

Full Moon ("Full Strawberry Moon") (or "Honey Moon")

June 29

Fri.

10:43 PM EDT

Moon @ apogee (406,062 km / 252,315 mi)

June 30 Sat. All Day Asteroid Day (Tunguska Impact in 1908 - 110 years ago)

June 30

Sat.

10:00 PM EDT

Moon 5° N of Mars

July 3 Tue. 8:00 PM EDT Moon 3° S of Neptune
July 4 Wed. All day Henrietta Leavitt born 150 years ago (1868)
July 4 Wed. 11:00 AM EDT Mercury 0.7° S of Beehive (M44)
July 5 Thur.

12:46 AM EDT - 3:05 AM EDT

Saturn occults TYC6277-323-1 (mag. 8.8)

July 6 Fri. 3:51 AM EDT Last Quarter Moon
July 6 Fri. 12:45 AM EDT Earth @ aphelion (1.0167 AU / 152.1 milion km / 94.5 million miles)
July 7 Sat. 10:00 AM EDT Moon 5° S of Uranus
July 9 Mon. 4:00 PM EDT Venus 1.1° N of Regulus
July 10 Tues. 6:00 AM EDT Moon 1.1° N of Aldebaran
July 10 Tue. 12:26 AM EDT Pluto @ closest approach (32.582 AU / 4.874 billion km / 3.03 billion mi)
July 11 Wed. 11:00 PM EDT Pluto @ opposition (mag. 14.2)
July 11 Wed. 11:00 PM EDT Asteroid 2 Pallas @ opposition
July 12 Thur. 1:00 AM EDT Mercury @ greatest elongation east (26°)
July 12 Thur. 5:41 AM EDT Pluto @ opposition
July 19 Thur. 9:48 PM EDT - 12:13  AM EDT Partial Solar Eclipse (visible from Antarctica)
July 12 Thur. 10:48 PM EDT New Moon
July 13 Fri. 4:25 AM EDT Moon @ perigee (357,430 km / 222,097 mi)
July 14 Sat. 6:00 PM EDT Moon 2° N of Mercury
July 15 Sun. 12:00 AM EDT Moon 1.6° N of Venus
July 15 Sun. 1:00 PM EDT Moon 1.8° N of Regulus
July 16 Mon.

1:19 AM EDT (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #14 (End of Primary Mission)

July 19 Thur. 3:52 PM  EDT First Quarter Moon
July 20 Fri. 7:53 AM EDT First landing on Mars 43 years ago (Viking 1, 1976)
July 20 Fri. 4:18 PM EDT First human landing on Moon 49 years ago (Apollo 11, 1969)
July 20 Fri. 8:00 PM EDT Moon 4° N of Jupiter
July 20 Fri. 9:00 PM EDT Sun enters Cancer
July 20 Fri. 10:56 PM EDT First human steps on Moon 49 years ago (Neil Armstrong)
July 23 Mon. All day Vera Rubin born 90 years ago (1928)
July 25 Wed. 2:00 AM EDT Moon 2° N of Saturn
July 27 Fri. 1:00 AM EDT Mars @ opposition
July 27 Fri. 1:44 AM EDT Moon @ apogee (406,223 km / 252,415 mi)
July 27 Fri. 4:20 PM EDT Full Moon ("Full Buck Moon")
July 27 Fri. 2:24 PM EDT - 6:19 PM EDT Total Lunar Eclipse (Eastern Hemisphere only)
July 27 Fri. 6:00 PM EDT Moon 7° N of Mars
July 30 Mon.   South Delta Aquariid meteors (poor, < 25 / hr))
July 31 Tues. 2:00 AM EDT Moon 3° S of Neptune
July 31 Tues. 4:00 AM EDT Mars @ closest approach (0.385 AU / 57,595,192 km / 35,787,993 mi)

   


 

An Overview of Major Astronomical Events in 2018
 

2018

Jan. 1

Mon.

3:00 PM EST

Mercury @ greatest elongation west (23°)

Jan. 3

Wed.

12:35 AM EST

Earth @ perihelion (0.98328 AU / 147,097,233 km / 91,401,983 mi)

Jan. 3

Wed.

7:14 AM EST

Latest sunrise of year (7:13:48 AM)

Jan. 3

Wed.

4:00 PM EST

Quadrantid meteors peak. (Poor.)

Jan. 8

Mon.

6:00 PM EST

Venus @ superior conjunction

Jan. 19

Fri.

4:42 AM EST - 4:56 AM EST

Double shadow transit on Jupiter (Europa, Ganymede)

Jan. 31

Wed.

5:51 AM EST - 6:56 AM EST

Total Lunar Eclipse (partial in Boston)

Jan. 31

Wed.

11:33 AM EST

Ceres @ opposition

Feb. 7

Wed.

8:53 AM EST (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #11

Feb. 17

Sat.

12:00 AM EST

Mercury @ superior conjunction

Mar. 4

Sun.

9:00 AM EST

Neptune @ superior conjunction

Mar. 11

Sun.

2:00 AM EST / 3:00 AM EDT

Daylight Saving Time begins

Mar. 15

Thur.

10:00 AM EDT

Mercury @ greatest elongation east (18°)

Mar. 17

Sat.

6:53 AM EDT - 6:53 PM EDT

Equilux (day and night of equal length)

Mar. 20

Tue.

12:15 PM EDT

March Equinox

Mar. 28

Wed.

8:30 PM EST

Venus 4' from Uranus

Mar. 31

Sat.

    

Deadline for Google Lunar X Prize

Apr. 1

Sun.

5:47 AM EDT (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #12

Apr. 1

Sun.

7:00 AM EDT

Mercury @ inferior conjunction

Apr. 16 Mon.  

Launch of TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite)

Apr. 18

Wed.

10:00 AM EDT

Uranus @ superior conjunction

Apr. 21

Sat.

All day

Astronomy Day (Spring)

Apr. 29

Sun.

11:06 AM EDT

Mercury @ greatest elongation west (27°)

May 5

Sat.

  7:05 AM EDT - 9:05 AM EDT

InSight Mars lander launched

May 5

Sat.

3:00 AM EDT

Eta Aquariid meteors peak. (Good.)

May 8

Tue.

9:00 PM EDT

Jupiter @ opposition

May 24

Thur.

1:41 AM EDT (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #13

May 23

Wed.

     

Fall Equinox, N. Hemisphere of Mars

June 1

Fri.

     

Hayabusa-2 orbital insertion around asteroid (162173) Ryugu

June 4 Mon. New Horizons wakes from hiberation prior to MU69 encounter

June 5

Fri.

3:00 PM EDT

Mercury @ superior conjunction

June 14

Thur.

5:07 AM EDT

Earliest sunrise

June 19

Tue.

4:00 PM EDT

Vesta @ opposition

June 21

Thur.

6:07 AM EDT

June (Summer) Solstice

June 26

Tue.

8:25 PM EDT

Latest sunset of year (8:25:22 PM)

June 27

Wed.

9:00 AM EDT

Saturn @ opposition

July 5

Thur.

12:46 AM EDT - 3:05 AM EDT

Saturn occults TYC6277-323-1 (mag. 8.8)

July 6

Fri.

12:46 PM EDT

Earth @ aphelion (1.017 AU / 152.1 milion km / 94.5 million miles)

July 12

Thur.

12:00 AM EDT

Mercury @ greatest elongation east (26°)

July 12

Thur.

6:00 AM EDT

Pluto @ opposition

July 16

Mon.

1:19 AM EDT (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #14 (End of Primary Mission)

July 27

Fri.

1:00 AM EDT

Mars @ opposition

July 31

Tue.

4:00 AM EDT

Mars @ closest approach (0.385 AU / 57,595,192 km / 35,787,993 mi)

Aug.

    

    

SpaceX Falcon 9 • Crew Dragon 2 Demo 1

Aug. 4 Sat.   Parker Soar Probe launched

Aug. 8

Wed.

3:00 PM EDT

Mercury @ inferior conjunction

Aug. 12

Sun.

9:00 PM EDT

Perseid meteors peak. (Very good.)

Aug. 13 Mon.   New Horizons switches to 3-axis stabilized mode

Aug. 15

Wed.

1:09 AM EDT

Venus @ dichotomy

Aug. 16 Thur.   New Horizons begins Approach Phase

Aug. 16

Thur.

8:06 PM EDT - 10:12 PM EDT

Double shadow transit on Jupiter (Io, Europa)

Aug. 17

Fri.

   

OSIRIS-REx orbital insertion around asteroid 101955 Bennu

Aug. 17

Fri.

3:58 PM EDT

Venus @ greatest elongation east (46°)

Aug. 21 Tue.   New Horizons attempts first imaging of MU69 target

Aug. 26

Sun.

5:58 AM EDT

Mercury @ greatest elongation west (18°)

Aug. 27 Mon.   Atlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test

Sept. 6

Thur.

9:14 PM EDT (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #15 (beginning of Extended Mission)

Sept. 7

Fri.

2:00 PM EDT

Neptune @ opposition

Sept. 16

Sun.

1:00 AM EDT

Mars @ perihelion

Sept. 20

Thur.

3:00 PM EDT

Mercury @ superior conjunction

Sept. 21

Fri.

6:00 AM EDT

Venus @ greatest brilliancy (mag. - 4.8)

Sept. 22

Sat.

9:54 PM EDT

September (Fall) Equinox

Sept. 25

Tue.

6:35 AM EDT / 6:36 PM EDT

Equilux (day and night of equal length)

Sept. 25

Tue.

12:17 AM EDT

Venus @ greatest brilliancy (- 4.6)

Sept. 28

Fri.

   

Parker Solar Probe Venus flyby #1

Oct.

   

   

Solar Orbiter ((ESA mission) launched

Oct. 3 Wed.   New Horizons Trajectory Correction Maneuver (?)

Oct. 5

Fri.

   

BepiColombo Mercury orbiter launched

Oct. 13

Sat.

All day

Astronomy Day (Fall)

Oct. 17

Wed.

   

Winter solstice, N. Hemisphere of Mars

Oct. 21

Sun.

2:00 PM EDT

Orionid meteors peak. (Poor.)

Oct. 23

Tue.

9:00 PM EDT

Uranus @ opposition

Oct. 26

Fri.

10:11 AM EDT

Venus @ inferior conjunction

Oct. 29

Mon.

5:08 PM EDT (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #16

Oct. 30 Tue.   Second Falcon Heavy launch; payload includes LightSail 2.

Nov. 1

Thur.

   

Parker Solar Probe perihelion #1

Nov. 4

Sun.

1:00 AM EST / 2:00 AM EDT

Daylight Saving Time ends

Nov. 6

Tue.

9:59 AM EST

Mercury @ greatest elongation east (23°)

Nov. 17

Sat.

6:00 PM EDT

Juno @ opposition

Nov. 17

Sat.

7:00 PM EST

Leonid meteors peak. (Poor.)

Nov. 20 Tue.   New Horizons Trajectory Correction Maneuver (?)

Nov. 26

Mon.

 3:00 PM EST

InSight lands in Elysium Planitia

Nov. 26

Mon.

6:00 PM EST

Jupiter @ superior conjunction

Nov. 26

Mon.

9:00 PM EST

Mercury @ superior conjunction

Dec.

   

   

Boeing CST-100 Starliner launched with human crew to ISS

Dec. 1

Sat.

8:00 PM EDT

Venus @ greatest brilliancy (mag. - 4.9)

Dec. 6

Thur.

4:11 PM EST

Earliest sunset of year (4:11:48 PM EST)

Dec. 12

Wed.

6:33 PM EST

Comet 46P/Wirtanen @ perihelion (157.9 million km / 98.1 million mi)

Dec. 14

Fri.

8:00 AM EST

Geminid meteors peak. (Poor.)

Dec. 15

Sat.

7:00 AM EST

Mercury @ greatest elongation west (18°)

Dec. 16

Sun.

9:56 AM EST

Comet 46P/Wirtanen closest (11.5 million km / 7.1 million mi / 30 L.D.)

Dec. 21

Fri.

6:58 AM EST - 7:12 AM EST

Venus occults HIP72373 (mag. 5.9) (sunrise: 7:10 AM)

Dec. 21

Fri.

12:02 PM EST (SCET)

Juno Jupiter orbiter Perijove #17

Dec. 21

Fri.

5:22 PM EST

December (Winter) Solstice

Dec. 22

Sat.

4:00 PM EST

Ursid meteors peak (poor)

Dec. 25 Tue.   New Horizons begins Core Phase

 

     


   

    Supernova Style Science News  with Ms. Julie Seven Sage

    


          

June 15, 2018 - 10:00 PM EDT