Boston

Astronomy
Welcome to the Boston Astronomy website ...

This website has been created by and is supported by a group of Boston, MA - area amateur astronomers. It is intended to be a convenient site to access news and information about astronomy and space-related activities of interest to the community and the public.


















       

            


      

New Astronomy Course Meeting!

 

Meet the Universe

 

We sit around our campfires as the ancients did, and ponder. How did the Universe come into existence? How did life begin? Are we alone? But now we see a Universe around us containing black holes, dark matter, and expanding space. What does it all mean? In this course we’ll sit around our own campfire, and try to piece together the stories that modern astronomy is teaching us.  

 

One meeting will be at a local observatory.

 

No math or science background required!

 

Meets at the Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 8 Tuesdays: April 4 -  May  23, 2017, 7:45 PM - 9:15 PM.

 

      


           

         

Supernova Style Science News

 with Ms. Julie Seven Sage

          

I would like to give a big shout-out to Ms. Julie Seven Sage. She is a 12-year old aspiring astrophysicist; did I say "aspiring"? I think she's most of the way there!

    

She has an unquenchable thirst for all new things in science - not just astronomy, but physics, biology, paleontology, materials science, and, as she puts it, "the people of science". She has been producing, with  the help of her parents, professional-quality videos discussing the latest news and developments in science and engineering. Julie is an amazing, enthusiastic young woman who will go far!

    

I cannot recommend strongly enough her videos and news clip updates.  Please visit her sites and see for yourselves: 

      

Website: www.supernovastylesciencenews.com

   

YouTube: Supernova Style Science News

 

She is also on Twitter, instagram, and Facebook.

   

Email: julie7sage@supernovastylesciencenews.com

 

News Email: news@supernovastylesciencenews.com

 

     


 

         

March Astronomy-Related Events in the Boston Area  

                      

        

Thursday, March 9, 2017, 8:00 PM - 10 PM

Amateur Telescope Makers of Boston (ATMoB) Monthly Meeting

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

60 Garden St.

Cambridge, MA 02138

http://www.atmob.org

Topic and Speaker: ‘Are We Special?’ – Engaging the Public with Astronomy and Nature Education
Douglas N. Arion, PhD Director, Carthage Institute of Astronomy, Carthage College President, Galileoscope LLC
One of the reasons human culture thinks itself more important and more valuable than other life forms, and deserving of the use of any and all resources on Earth, is the disconnect between themselves and the greater Universe. Astronomy is the perfect mechanism to re-create that engagement, and to alter perspectives about mankind’s place in the ‘big picture’, eliciting changes in attitudes and behaviors. Since 2012 a large-scale education and outreach effort based on astronomy has been conducted in a partnership between Carthage College and the Appalachian Mountain Club, through which more than 35,000 members of the public have received programming, and undergraduate science students and AMC permanent and seasonal staff and volunteers have been trained in science communication skills. This presentation will discuss the methods by which we engage the public, the ‘messaging’ we aim to achieve, and fascinating examples of the linkages between astronomy science content and human existence.
Dr. Douglas Arion is Director of the Carthage Institute of Astronomy, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, and Donald D. Hedberg Distinguished Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies at Carthage College. He manages a partnership between Carthage and the Appalachian Mountain Club to offer astronomy programs and observing opportunities at AMC facilities and New Hampshire state parks, and operates telescopes at AMC’s lodges and high mountain huts. He is a Lifetime member of the International Dark Sky Association, and serves on both the American Astronomical Society and International Astronomical Union commissions on dark skies preservation. For the International Year of Astronomy-2009, he, along with Rick Fienberg, co-founded Galileoscope LLC to develop, manufacture, and distribute high quality low cost telescopes for worldwide promotion of science education and outreach. Arion is actively involved in promoting technology entrepreneurship education. He founded the ScienceWorks entrepreneurship program at Carthage in 1994, and supported the creation of the Center for Advanced Technology and Innovation.
 

  

Friday, March 10 - Saturday, March 25, 2017, see website for show times; tickets required

Silent Sky
The Mosesian Center for the Arts
321 Arsenal Street
Watertown, MA

At Harvard Observatory at the turn of the 20th century, Henrietta Leavitt joins a group of women tasked with charting the heavens without being allowed to touch a telescope. Despite restrictions placed on her because of her sex, Henri devotes her life to the study of celestial bodies just out of reach, balancing the needs of love and family close at hand. Inspired by the real-life woman whose work allowed astronomers to measure the distance of faraway galaxies, Lauren Gunderson's melodious, evocative Silent Sky challenges how we explore our universe by revealing the music of the stars.

Silent Sky is supported in part by a grant from the Watertown Cultural Council, a local agency which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

Join Us for Post-show Talkbacks

Sunday, March 12, 2017, 2pm: Lindsay Smith, Curator of Astronomical Photographs & Archivist at the plate stacks at Harvard College Observatory
Friday, March 17, 2017, 8pm: Dava Sobel, New York Times best-selling author of The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars (also joined by Lindsay Smith)
Sunday, March 19, 2017, 2pm: Lindsay Smith, Curator of Astronomical Photographs & Archivist at the plate stacks at Harvard College Observatory 

         

     

 Saturday, March 11,  2017, 6:30 PM and 8:30 PM

Phases: A Lunar Fantasy 

Peabody Essex Museum

161 Essex Street

Salem, MA 01970

Two Special Performances 

$10 members, $15 students, $20 nonmembers. Free for children 16 and under

Location: Atrium

The Asia/America New Music Institute and PEM Composer-in-Residence Matthew Aucoin invite you on an interstellar adventure about growing up, facing fear and making art. Using lighting and projections to lift the Atrium into outer space, this music experience will delight the whole family. Learn more at pem.org/aucoin and aanmi.org. Featuring new music by Chad Cannon, Sun-Young Park, Sayo Kosugi, Paul Frucht, and Matthew Aucoin. Lighting and projection design by Mary Ellen Stebbins, Kevan Loney, and Bryce Cutler. Conceived and directed by Victoria Crutchfield. Approximate run time: 75 minutes, no intermission. Family-friendly concert. Purchase Tickets - 6:30pm. Wear your pajamas and get comfortable. Performance includes milk and cookies.18 and older concert. 8:30 pm | Atrium

        

            

Thursday, March 16, 2017, 7:30 PM

CfA Public Observatory Night

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
60 Garden Street

Cambridge, MA 02138
https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/publicevents

Topic and Speaker; "The Glass Universe", Dava Sobel

"The Glass Universe," Dava Sobel's latest masterpiece, tells the story of the women who worked at the Harvard College Observatory from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s. Hired by Edward Pickering because they were meticulous - and cheap labor - these women toiled over hundreds of thousands of glass photographic plates to carefully record the precious data contained therein. In the process, these hidden figures discovered the substance of the stars and the distances to them.

     

    

Plus (ongoing):        

          

Wednesdays:

Boston University

Boston, MA.
Open Night at Coit Observatory most Wednesdays 8:30 PM - 9:30 PM. 

617-353-2630
http://www.bu.edu/astronomy/events/public-open-night-at-the-observatory/  

    

     

Thursdays (every 3rd Thursday), 8:30 PM:

CfA Public Observatory Night

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
60 Garden Street

Cambridge, MA 02138
https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/publicevents

          

      

Fridays (every week), 8:30 PM

Guilliland Observatory

Museum of Science

1 Science Park

Boston, MA 02114

617-589-0267

https://www.mos.org/public-events/astronomy-after-hours

       

          

 

The Sky Report for the Month of March 2017

                      

Daylight Saving Time begins at 2:00 am, on Sunday, March 12, for most areas of the U.S. and Canada.

In accordance with the adage, "spring forward, fall back," move your clocks ahead one hour; the minute after 1:59 am begins as 3:00 am.

              

    The March Equinox occurs at 6:29 am EDT on March 20. This represents the instant the Sun crosses the celestial equator on its way north.

By convention, it is considered the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere and of fall in the southern hemisphere.

                   

Current Night Sky: At A Glance

                        

            Phases of the Moon:

                           

                              

First Quarter

March 5

  6:32 AM EST 

Full Moon

March 12

10:54 AM EDT

Last Quarter Moon

March 18

11:58 AM EDT

New Moon

March 27

10:57 PM EDT

 

                                               

The Moon & Planets:

  

    

Planet Visibility:

    

In Evening (after sunset):

    Mercury, in W 

    Venus, in W

    Uranus, in W 

    Mars, in W 

             

 At Midnight:

    Jupiter, in S

     

 In Morning (before sunrise):

    Jupiter, in SW

    Saturn, in S

    Neptune, in E

    Venus, in E 

         

     

Comets:

    

    •     There are no comets brighter than magnitude 8 visible this month.
  •          

Meteors:      

  •     
    •     There no significant meteor showers in March.
  •       
            

                                                            

                             

                    

                                         

A half hour before sunrise in early March, two planets - Jupiter and Saturn – shine above the southern horizon. Planets cannot appear just anywhere in the sky.

They orbit the Sun along the ecliptic – the imaginary line (shown here in green) which represents the plane of the Solar System.

 (March 1, 2017, 5:50 am EST).

                                  

                               

                                              

        

                            

A half hour after sunset, Mars, Uranus, and the thin, three-day-old crescent Moon cluster within a few degrees of each other, with brilliant Venus to their lower right. (While the Moon, Venus, and Mars are easy to spot, Uranus generally takes binoculars or a small telescope to see well.

You can use the brighter objects as a guide to finding dim Uranus.)

Note that all these objects, too, follow the ecliptic (green line), marking out the plane of the Solar System.

 (March 1, 2017, 6:04 pm EST).

              

                                        

                                          

  

                  

      Venus, by virtue of orbiting closer to the Sun than Earth, also moves faster. Periodically, it "laps" our planet and passes almost directly between us and the Sun. This is known as "inferior conjunction," and for several days around that time, Venus may be too close to the Sun to be visible in our skies at all.

(March 25, 2017, 10:00 am EDT).                     

                                            


                                          

 New Earths?

           

Exoplanets – planets around stars other than our Sun – are extraordinarily difficult to detect. Stars themselves are extremely distant, and any planets around them – shining only by reflected light from their host – will always be fainter than the star and likely lost in its glare. Few exoplanets have actually been seen; their observation requires indirect techniques, such as inferring their presence by observed effects upon the star. Yet since the first exoplanets were detected in the 1990s, the rate of their discovery has soared. As of the beginning of this month, there have been over 3500 discovered, in about 2700 star systems.

         

The ultimate goal of this search is to find planets like Earth – planets that are habitable (and potentially inhabited) – by life as we know it. At a minimum, this requires planets with surfaces that can support liquid water – an irreducible requirement for Earth life. This implies planets with solid surfaces (as opposed to, say, gas giants). It is also helpful if the planets are in the star's habitable zone- not so close as water would boil nor so far that it would freeze. So far, several such candidate planets have been found.

             

One of the most exciting announcements in this search came in February, and concerns the star known as TRAPPIST-1 – a dim red dwarf 39 light-years away. Research has shown that there are at least seven planets closely huddled around this star. That in itself is not necessarily significant; at least three other seven-planet systems are known. What is striking about the TRAPPIST-1 system is that all seven of these planets are rocky and approximately Earth-sized, and at least three – perhaps more – are in the star's habitable zone.

        

In accordance with standard practice, the planets are designated as TRAPPIST-1b, TRAPPIST-1c, etc., through TRAPPIST-1h. In the drawing below, they are shown in their approximate sizes. (Their appearance, though, is an artist’s conception; we don’t yet know what their surfaces or atmospheres would look like.) (Courtesy: NASA/JPL). 

          

          

  

      

The relative proximity of TRAPPIST-1, and the fortuitous fact that all seven planets transit the disk of the star as seen from Earth – makes this system a potential gold mine of information about the planets. Large Earth-based telescopes, the Hubble telescope in orbit around Earth, and most especially, the James Webb Space Telescope once it is launched in 2018, will be brought to bear on the system. The odds are good that we will soon learn more about the TRAPPIST-1 planets – in particular, the compositions of any atmospheres they may have. Signs of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and methane may be signatures of life on these worlds. So stay tuned!

  
  
         
A Schedule of Events - March 2017
      

Mar. 1 Wed. 11:00 AM EST Moon 4° S of Uranus
Mar. 1 Wed. 2:00 PM EST Moon 4° S of Mars
Mar. 1 Wed. 3:00 PM EST Mars, Uranus, and Moon within circle 4.16° in diameter
Mar. 1 Wed. 10:00 PM EST Neptune @ solar conjunction
Mar. 2 Thur. 4:00 PM EST Moon passes 0.8° S of Ceres
Mar. 3 Fri. 2:33 AM EST Moon @ perigee (369,063 km / 229,325 mi)
Mar. 4 Sat. 11:25 PM EST Near-occultation of Aldebaran by Moon
Mar. 5 Sun.   Cassini distant flyby of Titan
Mar. 5 Sun. 6:32 AM EST First Quarter Moon
Mar. 6 Mon. 7:00 PM EST Mercury @ superior conjunction
Mar. 10 Fri. 6:00 PM EST Moon 0.8° S of Regulus
Mar. 11 Sat. 8:00 PM EST Sun enters Pisces
Mar. 12 Sun. 2:00 AM EST / 3:00 AM EDT Daylight Savings Time in effect; move clocks forward one hour
Mar. 12 Sun. 10:54 AM EDT Full Moon ("Full Worm Moon")
Mar. 14 Tue.   Cassini distant flybys of Epimetheus and Pandora
Mar. 14 Tue. 4:00 PM EDT Moon 2° N of Jupiter
Mar. 15 Wed. 3 :00 AM EDT Jupiter, Spica, and the waning gibbous Moon form a triange
Mar. 17 Fri. 6:53 AM EDT and 6:53 PM EDT Equilux - times of daylight and night are equal in Boston
Mar. 17 Fri. 6:00 PM EDT Saturn @ western quadrature
Mar. 18 Sat. 1:25 PM EDT Moon @ apogee (404,650 km / 251,438 mi)
Mar. 18 Sat. 2:00 PM EDT Mercury 8.5° SSE of Venus
Mar. 20 Mon.   Cassini distant flyby of Titan
Mar. 20 Mon. 6:00 AM EDT Moon 3° N of Saturn
Mar. 20 Mon. 6:29 AM EDT March Equinox
Mar. 20 Mon. 11:58 AM EDT Last Quarter Moon
Mar. 21 Tue.   Cassini distant flyby of Janus, Pallene, Pan
Mar. 22 Wed. 6:59 PM EDT (sunset) Venus visible as "evening star"; altitude 5°
Mar. 23 Thur. 6:42 AM EDT (sunrise) Venus visible as "morning star"; altitude 5°
Mar. 25 Sat. 6:00 AM EDT Venus @ inferior conjunction
Mar. 26 Sun. 4:00 AM EDT Moon 0.005° S of Neptune
Mar. 27 Mon. 2:00 AM EDT Mercury 2° N of Uranus
Mar. 27 Mon. 10:57 PM EDT New Moon
Mar. 28 Tue.   Cassini distant flybys of Encelaus and Mimas
Mar. 29 Wed. 3:00 AM EDT Moon 7° S of Mercury
Mar. 30 Thur. 8:32 AM EDT Moon @ perigee (363,853 km / 226,088 mi)
Mar. 30 Thur. 9:00 AM EDT Moon 5° S of Mars
Apr. 1 Sat. 5:00 AM EDT Moon 0.3° N of Aldebaran
Apr. 1 Sat. 6:00 AM EDT Mercury @ greatest eastern elongation (19.0° E); Evening "Star"
Apr. 3 Mon. 2:39 PM EDT First Quarter Moon
Apr. 5 Wed.   Distant Flyby of Atlas, Pandora & Epimetheus
Apr. 7 Fri. 1:00 AM EDT Moon 0.7° S of Regulus
Apr. 7 Fri. 6:00 PM EDT Jupiter @ opposition
Apr. 10 Mon. 5:00 PM EDT Moon 2° N of Jupiter
Apr. 11 Tue. 2:08 AM EDT Full Moon ("Full Pink Moon")
Apr. 12 Wed. 2:00 PM EDT Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak @ perihelion (mag. 6.7?)
Apr. 14 Fri. 2:00 PM EDT Uranus @ solar conjunction
Apr. 15 Sat. 6:05 AM EDT Moon @ apogee (405,474 km / 251,950 mi)
Apr. 16 Sun. 2:00 PM EDT Moon 3° N of Saturn
Apr. 19 Wed. 5:57 AM EDT Last Quarter Moon
Apr. 19 Wed. 5:00 PM EDT Sun enters Taurus
Apr. 20 Thur. 2:00 AM EDT Mercury @ inferior conjunction
Apr. 22 Sat.   March for Science
Apr. 22 Sat.   Cassini Titan flyby begins Proximal Orbit Phase ("Grand Finale")
Apr. 22 Sat.   Lyrid meteors peak (good; up to 18 meteors / hour)
Apr. 22 Sat. 4:00 PM EDT Moon 0.2° S of Neptune
Apr. 23 Sun. 2:00 PM EDT Moon 5° S of Venus
Apr. 24 Mon. 12:00 PM EDT Moon 0.8° N of Pallas
Apr. 26 Wed.   Cassini Distant Flyby of Janus, Atlas, Daphnis & Epimetheus
Apr. 26 Wed. 8:16 AM EDT New Moon
Apr. 27 Thur. 12:15 PM EDT Moon @ perigee (359,326 km / 223,275 mi)
Apr. 28 Fri. 4:00 AM EDT Moon 6° S of Mars
Apr. 28 Fri. 2:00 PM EDT Moon 0.5° N of Aldebaran
Apr. 29 Sat.   National Astronomy Day (spring)
Apr. 29 Sat. 5:00 PM EDT Venus @ greatest brilliancy (magnitude - 4.7)

  
   (bold = cool or important)   
   

          
 An Overview of Major 2017 Astronomical Events
     
2017
Jan. 3 Tue. 7:14:38 AM EST Latest sunrise of year in Boston
Jan. 3 Tue. 9:00 AM EST Quadrantid meteors
Jan. 4 Wed. 9:00 AM EST Earth @ perihelion (0.98331 AU / 147,101,111 km / 91,404,393 mi)
Jan. 12 Thur. 8:00 AM EST Venus @ greatest eastern elongation (47.1° E); Evening "Star"
Jan. 12 Thur. 6:00 PM EST Venus 0.4° N of Neptune (21' 57" in Boston)
Jan. 17 Tue. 8:00 PM EST Vesta @ opposition (mag. 6.3)
Jan. 19 Thur. 1:00 AM EST Jupiter 2.7° S of Moon
Jan. 19 Thur. 5:00 AM EST Mercury @ greatest western elongation (24.1° W); Morning "Star"
Jan. 31 Tue. 6:00 PM EST Mars, Venus, and waxing crescent Moon fit into circle 6° in diameter
Feb. 11 Sat. 5:34 PM EST - 9:53 PM EST Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
Feb. 17 Fri. 2:00 AM EST Venus @ greatest illuminated extent
Feb. 26 Sun. 7:10 AM EST - 12:38 PM EST Annular Solar Eclipse (SW Africa. S. Atlantic, South America)
Feb. 26 Sun. 8:15 PM EST Mars 34' N of Uranus
Mar. 1 Wed. 10:00 PM EST Neptune @ solar conjunction
Mar. 12 Sun. 2:00 AM EST Daylight Saving Time begins
Mar. 17 Fri. 6:53 AM EDT and 6:53 PM EDT Equilux - times of daylight and night are equal in Boston
Mar. 20 Mon. 6:29 AM EDT March Equinox
Mar. 25 Sat. 6:00 AM EDT Venus @ inferior conjunction
Apr. 1 Sat. 6:00 AM EDT Mercury @ greatest eastern elongation (19.0° E); Evening "Star"
Apr. 7 Fri. 5:00 PM EDT Jupiter @ opposition
Apr. 12 Wed. 2:00 PM EDT Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak @ perihelion (mag. 5?)
Apr. 14 Fri. 2:00 AM EDT Uranus @ solar conjunction
Apr. 22 Sat. 8:00 AM EDT Lyrid meteors
Apr. 22 Sat.   Cassini Titan flyby begins Proximal Orbit Phase ("Grand Finale")
Apr.29 Sat. All day National Astronomy Day (spring)
Apr. 30 Sun. 12:00 AM EDT Venus @ greatest illuminated extent
May 4 Thur. 9:00 AM EDT Eta Aquarid meteors
May 17 Wed. 7:00 PM EDT Mercury @ greatest western elongation (25.8° W); Morning "Star"
Jun. 2 Fri. 10:00 AM EDT Venus 2° S of Uranus
Jun. 3 Sat. 7:00 AM EDT Venus @ greatest western elongation (45.9° W); Morning "Star"
Jun. 3 Sat. 8:00 PM EST Moon 2° N  of Jupiter
Jun. 3 Sat. 10:24 PM EDT - 12:21 AM EDT Double shadow transit on Jupiter (Io, Ganymede)
Jun. 12 Wed. 4:00 AM EDT Comet C/2015 V2 (Johnson) @ perihelion (mag. 6?)
Jun. 14 Wed. 5:07:00 AM EDT Earliest sunrise of year in Boston
Jun. 15 Thur. 5:00 AM EDT Saturn @ opposition
Jun. 19 Mon. 10:06 PM EDT - 10:38 PM EDT Double shadow transit on Jupiter (Io, Europa)
Jun. 21 Wed. 12:25 AM EDT June Solstice
Jun. 27 Tue. 8:25:22 PM EDT Latest sunset of year in Boston
Jul. 3 Mon. 4:00 AM EDT Earth @ aphelion (1.01668 AU / 152,093,193 km / 94,506,329 mi)
Jul. 10 Mon. 12:10 AM EDT Pluto @ opposition
Jul. 26 Wed. 9:00 PM EDT Mars @ superior comjunction
Jul. 28 Fri. 9:00 PM EDT Moon 2° N of Jupiter
Jul. 30 Sun. 12:00 AM EDT Mercury @ greatest eastern elongation (27.2° E); Evening "Star"
Aug. 7 Mon. 11:50 AM EDT - 4:50  PM EDT Partial Lunar Eclipse (Eastern Hemisphere)
Aug. 12 Sat. 3:00 PM EDT Perseid meteors
Aug. 21 Mon. 11:46 AM EDT - 5:04 PM EDT Total Solar Eclipse (Partial 9:28 AM EDT - 11:59 PM EDT in Boston)
Sept. 5 Tue. 12:00 AM EDT Neptune @ opposition
Sept. 12 Tue. 6:00 AM EDT Mercury @ greatest western elongation (17.9° W); Morning "Star
Sept. 15 Fri. 8:07 AM EDT Cassini enters atmosphere of Saturn, burns up
Sept. 16 Sat. 2:00 PM EDT Mercury 0.03° N of Mars (3.2' in Pacific, 18' in Boston)
Sept. 22 Fri. 4:02 PM EDT September Equinox
Sept. 23 Sat.   OSIRIS_REx Earth flyby
Sept. 25 Mon. 6:35 AM EDT and 6:35 PM EDT Equilux - length of daylight and night are equal in Boston
Sept. 30 Sat. All day Astronomy Day (fall)
Oct. 5 Thur. 9:00 AM EDT Venus 0.2° N of Mars
Oct. 7 Sat.   Mars @ aphelion
Oct. 19 Thur. 1:00 PM EDT Uranus @ opposition
Oct. 26 Thur. 2:12 PM EDT Jupiter @ solar conjunction
Nov. 5 Sun. 2:00 AM EDT Daylight Saving Time ends
Nov. 5 Sun. 9:03 PM EST - 9:59 PM EST Moon occults Aldebaran
Nov. 13 Mon. 1:00 AM EST Venus 0.3° N of Jupiter
Nov. 17 Fri. 12:00 PM EST Leonid meteors
Nov. 23 Thur. 7:00 PM EST Mercury @ greatest eastern elongation (22.0° E); Evening "Star"
Nov. 28 Tue. 5:00 AM EST Mercury 3° S of Saturn
Dec. 8 Fri. 4:11:42 PM EST Earliest sunset of year in Boston
Dec. 14 Thur. 1:00 AM EST Geminid meteors
Dec. 21 Thur. 11:29 PM EST December Solstice
Dec. 21 Thur. 6:00 PM EST Saturn @ solar conjunction
Dec. 22 Fri. 10:00 AM EST Ursid meteors
Dec. 30 Sat. 7:28 PM EST - 8:21 PM EST Moon occults Aldebaran
            
     
  
   March 16, 2017    
         

                   

                                             

 

the era of “extremely large telescopes”.